Are we being looked at under a microscope?

This post was written by Rhonda Wasserman

Original content by Ashley Berges

How do you think others see you?  We want people to see how great we are.  On the other hand, we may feel that people can see all our faults and shortcomings.  How closely are people looking at us? Do they remember what shirt we wore last week?  Here are three things that people see when they are looking at you. 

1. The first thing people see is your faults.  They see these faults first because they have these faults within themselves.  When we are busy concentrating on our shortcomings, they are often the first thing we identify in someone else. 

2. Second, people tend to see the similarities they have with you.  We are looking for connections with others.  When we find similarities to others it helps to bring us together.  Therefore, any type of similarities such as height, clothing style, or even communication style can unite us.

3. The third thing people see when they see you, is a mirror image of themselves.  Have you ever met someone that you did not like instantaneously?  This may be because we show people a mirror image of themselves.  This allows them to see all the things they do not like about themselves. They may never truly see you; they are only seeing you through their own eyes.  This means that they may not see what you consider your faults, all they see is the reflection of themselves in you.  As a result, they will see the faults within themselves, and the similarities to you and see the mirror image.

We must stop caring so much about what other people think about us because it truly does not matter.  The next time you run into someone and worry about what they think about you, remember it’s not about you.  People only see what they want to see.  They only see what attracts them to you, their faults, and those faults within you.  You need to be you, and live your true life.

Watch the entire video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNXw_eLC4tg



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